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Kingsman : The Secret Service Movie Review

Kingsman -The Secret Service movie review
Kingsman -The Secret Service movie review

An aggressive, witty spy movie backed power violence yet a breath of fresh air in bandwagon of spy movies.

Cast and Crew

Kingsman has some of the most interesting cast and crew. It starts with Michael Caine, Samuel L. Colin Firth, Jackson, Jack Davenport, Taron Egerton, Sofia Boutella, Mark Strong, Mark Hamill and end with Sophie Cookson.  The director is Matthew Vaughn, while the movie falls under the genre of Action with a movie runtime of 2 hours and 10 minutes to be precise.

The Story The story and straight yet has loads of stuff to make the audience enjoy and giggle. The characters of Kingsmen are simply not answerable to the law of land or government nor can be influenced externally. When you see one of them being killed due to the judgement error of agent Harry Firth, he is seen supporting Eggsy (Egerton) who is comrade’s son in order to be the Kingsman. Later, they need to foil the tech tycoon Valentine’s evil designs, which involve the mass murder and mind control.

The Movie Analysis

Kingsman is basically a secret service, which is armed with ingenious gadgets, having high end heroes with capability to even identify a rare brand of scotch with just from their smell only, megalomaniacal villains and lethal henchwomen who have blades instead of their legs. The film is ferociously violent apart from being funny and filthy unlike the 007 movies have been captivating for the audience all these years. However, it is not any Bond movie; it can be called the director’s tribute to spy films more or less in the same puckish fashion. Here you have Colin Firth’s Super Spy Harry Hart who is seen in Harry Palmer spectacles busy brandishing the John Steed umbrella with more than a touch of Solo about him. However, the shadow of Bond seems looming more on the movie with Ian Fleming’s creation in a regular fashion name carried out in his own modern way.

The director comes with a cultural magpie and the movie doffs its trilby to some other inspirations from flicks like MIB, My Fair Lady and Trading Places as you see Harry taking Eggy under his wings and thus grooms him to become a perfect killer cum gentleman with full metal smoking jacket.  When you find the duo mentor and mentee together in any Q scene, their chemistry is often seen too much crackling. On the other side, Firth is seen having loads of his time of his life having the deadpan but the warm Harry whereas the newcomer Taron Egeron is seen bringing up the charm to Eggy’s rough edges, which comes out to be the contemporary conveyor belt of these new talents, which has expelled the likes of Sieena Miler and Chole Grace Moretz.

Nevertheless, you find the movie keeping them apart especially Harry while he in the midst of investigation of Samuel L Jackson’s lisping villain and even Eggsy during his rote training section. The fact of the matter is from a couple of F bombs and an early scene wherein Harry is seen teaching the pub full of hooligans in some manners, the very first hour is seen too little conventional even a smaller tame. Where you could think of asking, is the director who unleashed Hit Girl upon any unsuspecting public. Then the show is seen lifting up, firstly with the supercharged and sustained melee – scored, remarkably, to the weepy guitar solo of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Free Bird – in which you find the Firth shooting, stabbing, impaling, strangling, exploding and immolating the entire bunch of people in such a way, which would make the Bridget Jones soil her massive pants. Soon you find the film entering into a wild third act with morally dubious, exhilarating and exhausting systems. Here, you can find the Bond’s 007 usually escalating to 0011, culminating in a gloriously and audacious OTT visual conceit, which is hard to be seen before in any mainstream film.

Our Verdict

Perhaps Kingsman is the riskiest mainstream movie releasing this year, while Matthew Vaughn’s love letter towards the spy movies could be at times be uneven in places, however, it can be fiercely violent, envelope-pushing, and backed by fun, which has the potential to overcome the remaining flaws. All this is possible due to the smooth balance of cool humor, incredible action and novel plot as well. In a sense Kingsman: The Secret Service can be called as a breath of fresh air in bandwagon of spy movies.

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